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Dead medium: 'Vinyl Video' conceptual art project
From: richard@hrc.wmin.ac.uk (Richard Barbrook)

Source(s): Gebhard Sengmueller, Onlineloop/Erhart-Zauner (gebseng@thing.at); Inke Arns (inke@berlin.snafu.de,
http://berlin.icf.de/~inke)

(((bruces remarks: we Dead Media Necronauts are selflessly disinterring the authentic fossil record, and here come these conceptual art jokers to deliberately blur and confuse the evidence! On the other hand, "Vinyl Video" *does* appear to be an actual, working, vinyl-based video playback machine, so presumably it deserves an authentic place in the ranks of dead media on its own account.)))

Project Description (by Gebhard Sengmueller):

"VinylVideo (TM) - a project by Gebhard Sengmueller and Onlineloop/Erhart-Zauner

"VinylVideo (TM) is a fake archeology of media.

"We designed a device that retrieves video signals (moving image and sound) stored on a conventional vinyl (LP) record.

"The discontinuity in the development of electronic film technology constitutes the historical background for this fictitious video disc technology. Even though television, the electronic transmission of moving images, had been feasible since the late 1920s, storage of these images became possible only after development of the video recorder in 1958. Recording images for private use did not become available until the mass introduction of the VCR in the late 1980 (!). Before, the average consumer was confined to use Super-8 film, a technology dating back to 1900, usually without sound. Recording of television was not possible at all.

"VinylVideo(TM) reconstructs a home movie technology of the late 40s/early 50s, and thus bridges a gap in the history of consumer technology. The images are stored on a conventional analogue record, with a running time of ca. 20 min. / side (singles 5 min. / side).

"These records are played on a standard turntable with an ordinary diamond needle, the images are then processed by a 'Black Box' into a video signal that is displayed on a black and white TV-set."

Gebhard Sengmueller's e-mail address is: gebseng@thing.at

Dr. Richard Barbrook (richard@hrc.wmin.ac.uk)
Hypermedia Research Centre School of Communications, Design & Media University of Westminster
Watford Road
Northwick Park
HARROW HA1 3TP

http://www.hrc.wmin.ac.uk/